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Actiniaria
SEA ANEMONES
Life   Cnidaria   Anthozoa

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Clown fish and sea anemones
© John Pickering, 2004-2017 · 0
Clown fish and sea anemones
Clown fish in sea anemone
© John Pickering, 2004-2017 · 0
Clown fish in sea anemone

Clown fish in sea anemone
© John Pickering, 2004-2017 · 0
Clown fish in sea anemone
Clown fish in sea anemone
© John Pickering, 2004-2017 · 0
Clown fish in sea anemone

Anthopleura xanthogrammica, center, Anthopleura sola, top left
© John Pickering, 2004-2017 · 0
Anthopleura xanthogrammica, center, Anthopleura sola, top left
Sea anemone
© John Pickering, 2004-2017 · 0
Sea anemone

Sea anemones
© John Pickering, 2004-2017 · 0
Sea anemones
Sea anemones at the aquarium in Bristol Zoo, Bristol, England
© Public Domain · 0
Sea anemones at the aquarium in Bristol Zoo, Bristol, England
Kinds
Overview
Sea anemones are flower-like Cnidarians that are widely distributed throughout the world and reside in both shallow and deep waters. Sea Anemones remain attached to objects like rocks, coral, sometimes even hermit crabs, by anchoring themselves using an organ called the pedal disk. They are single polyps and have tentacles around their mouths which, like all cnidarians, have nematocysts that have the ability to sting a variety of toxins into their prey (fish, mussels, zooplankton and worms). They can have symbiotic relationships with several other organisms, the most well-known one being with the clownfish. The anemones sometimes provide a home and protection for clownfish. Of the 1104 valid species, only 10 host clownfish, which do not get stung by the anemones due to the layer of protective mucus on their skin. Some people in the Mediterranean and parts of the Indo-Pacific eat boiled and spiced anemones.

Identification

Phylogeny

Links to other sites

Acknowledgements
Daphne G. Fautin
University of Kansas, Lawrence

Research funded through The National Foundation of Science REU grant

John Pickering
University of Georgia, Athens

We thank Denise Lim for technical support in developing this page.


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Updated: 2017-08-23 23:14:24 gmt
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